Yes California Independence Campaign on Nov. 9, 2016 discusses a budding movement to make California a standalone nation. Marcus Ruiz Evans, shown here, later quit the group, and on Aug. 17, 2017 pushed a new effort calling for a constitutional co Taryn Luna The Sacramento Bee
Yes California Independence Campaign on Nov. 9, 2016 discusses a budding movement to make California a standalone nation. Marcus Ruiz Evans, shown here, later quit the group, and on Aug. 17, 2017 pushed a new effort calling for a constitutional co Taryn Luna The Sacramento Bee

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Capitol Alert

Calexit III? New ballot measure plots another route to California independence

By Jim Miller

jmiller@sacbee.com

August 17, 2017 02:13 PM

First there was Calexit. Then came Calexit II.

On Thursday, people unhappy with California’s place in the United States filed yet another proposed ballot measure that could lead to the Golden State striking out on its own.

This time, the goal is convening a U.S. constitutional convention to overhaul what proponents call a moldy national blueprint out of step with life in California.

The measure says a reworked Constitution should include a provision creating a “clear and reasonable path for states to achieve complete independence from the United States should any state so choose.” No state has become independent under the existing U.S. Constitution.

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“The world has changed dramatically since 1787,” reads the preamble of the California Calls for a Constitutional Convention, or “Cal Con Con.”

Thursday’s measure is the latest attempt at using the ballot box to revamp California’s relationship with the federal government. A “CalExit” proposal set a timeline for votes on independence, which fizzled. A measure filed this spring seeks more autonomy, and possible independence.

The Cal Con Con team includes Marcus Ruiz Evans, who was vice president of Yes California that crafted Calexit I. He resigned this spring when the effort petered out, saying that movement’s leader, Louis J. Marinelli, had become a distraction because of his ties to Russia.

This video describes a proposal to allow California to split from the United States. Sharon OkadaThe Sacramento Bee