Developer Sotiris Kolokotronis is planning to revive the former Clarion Hotel at 16th and H streets into a 1950’s-style boutique hotel. Dreyfuss+Blackford Architecture
Developer Sotiris Kolokotronis is planning to revive the former Clarion Hotel at 16th and H streets into a 1950’s-style boutique hotel. Dreyfuss+Blackford Architecture

City Beat

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City Beat

Boutique retro hotel and modern apartments move ahead near Memorial Auditorium

By Ryan Lillis

rlillis@sacbee.com

October 04, 2017 11:12 AM

UPDATED October 04, 2017 03:12 PM

A planned makeover of the old Clarion Hotel at 16th and H streets into a 1950s-style boutique hotel is moving forward after the Sacramento City Council voted Tuesday night to allow hotel guests to park in a nearby city garage.

That parking arrangement was also extended to residents of a 75-unit apartment building being built across 16th Street by the same development team led by Sotiris Kolokotronis and the Grupe Company. Hotel guests can park in the Memorial Garage at 15th and H streets, with the city billing the hotel for each space used. Up to 60 apartment residents will have spots in the garage and will pay 120 percent of the “prevailing market rate,” according to a city staff report.

Kolokotronis and city officials said the lenders financing the hotel and apartment projects require long-term parking arrangements, a common stipulation in such developments.

Kolokotronis’ hotel project would revive what started as the Mansion Inn in the 1950s and was later rebranded as a Clarion. He is planning to turn it into a 110-room boutique hotel with retro art, similar to downtown’s Citizen Hotel. The design is still being finalized and construction could begin by the end of this year, he said.

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Across 16th Street, Kolokotronis said he is a few weeks away from receiving city approval on the 1600H Lofts building. That apartment complex would replace a parking lot.

The apartment building would have a courtyard and fitness center, and many apartments will have balconies or patios. Five “live-work” spaces will sit on the ground floor, and the rest of the apartments will be a mix of studios and one-bedroom and two-bedroom units.

Kolokotronis has quickly re-emerged as a major force in the midtown development scene.

Before running into financial difficulty during the housing downturn, Kolokotronis built some of the most prominent new projects in midtown, including the Fremont Building at 16th and P streets, the 1801 L apartment building and the L Street Lofts across the street at 1818 L St., a project he eventually lost to foreclosure. His business has since come roaring back. Between the new 16th Street projects and other developments near 20th and Q streets, Kolokotronis and his partners are in the process of building more than 400 residences.

The developer said demand is high in the central city.

“(Apartments) are being built by the dozens, but we need to be building by the hundreds,” he said.

Ryan Lillis: 916-321-1085, @Ryan_Lillis